Search result for #learnaboutsharks
remydee504

@remydee504

Remy Dee
4 hours ago
remydee504
Can this be me please? #sharks #ocean #goals . . . #repost @oceanramsey (@get_repost) ・・・ #standuppaddling and drifting through #sharks heading back to this beautiful part of the world where sharks are protected. #bahamas i’m trying to film something educational about coexistence and to discuss what to do and what not to do but they want to do it by breaking down examples of what went wrong. i know it’s good to learn from others mistakes but i don’t like to focus on negative instances in general but i hope i can impart some reality and share some of the science and practical application of living, diving, and respecting sharks, their important ecological role, and their sensory systems. simple things like if i splash on the surface they respond because they are attuned to possible prey items like birds landing on the surface. it may be human instinct to thrash in fear but i want to break down and share the do’s and donts of how best to respond when approached by a shark in a variety of situations and conditions, times of day, etc. looking forward to sharing more and hopefully some more sunshine and sharks everyday ☀️🦈🦈💙 #travelforacause video by @juansharks with @lauracorbe @andycorbe @natseamonkey #sharks #shark #surfingwithsharks #supwithsharks interested in #sup #standuppaddling check out @oneoceanconservation lead & fellow #oneoceanseaster & #sharkdiver @mermaidyogagirlboss & her company @yogakaihawaii out of @fourseasons in #koolina #oahu #learnaboutsharks #oneoceandiving @oneoceandiving
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sualtigazetesi

@sualtigazetesi

SG Foto Haber
4 hours ago
sualtigazetesi
#repost @oceanramsey with @get_repost ・・・ #standuppaddling and drifting through #sharks heading back to this beautiful part of the world where sharks are protected. #bahamas i’m trying to film something educational about coexistence and to discuss what to do and what not to do but they want to do it by breaking down examples of what went wrong. i know it’s good to learn from others mistakes but i don’t like to focus on negative instances in general but i hope i can impart some reality and share some of the science and practical application of living, diving, and respecting sharks, their important ecological role, and their sensory systems. simple things like if i splash on the surface they respond because they are attuned to possible prey items like birds landing on the surface. it may be human instinct to thrash in fear but i want to break down and share the do’s and donts of how best to respond when approached by a shark in a variety of situations and conditions, times of day, etc. looking forward to sharing more and hopefully some more sunshine and sharks everyday ☀️🦈🦈💙 #travelforacause video by @juansharks with @lauracorbe @andycorbe @natseamonkey #sharks #shark #surfingwithsharks #supwithsharks interested in #sup #standuppaddling check out @oneoceanconservation lead & fellow #oneoceanseaster & #sharkdiver @mermaidyogagirlboss & her company @yogakaihawaii out of @fourseasons in #koolina #oahu #learnaboutsharks #oneoceandiving @oneoceandiving
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oceanramsey

@oceanramsey

Ocean Ramsey #HelpSaveSharks
5 hours ago
oceanramsey
#standuppaddling and drifting through #sharks heading back to this beautiful part of the world where sharks are protected. #bahamas i’m trying to film something educational about coexistence and to discuss what to do and what not to do but they want to do it by breaking down examples of what went wrong. i know it’s good to learn from others mistakes but i don’t like to focus on negative instances in general but i hope i can impart some reality and share some of the science and practical application of living, diving, and respecting sharks, their important ecological role, and their sensory systems. simple things like if i splash on the surface they respond because they are attuned to possible prey items like birds landing on the surface. it may be human instinct to thrash in fear but i want to break down and share the do’s and donts of how best to respond when approached by a shark in a variety of situations and conditions, times of day, etc. looking forward to sharing more and hopefully some more sunshine and sharks everyday ☀️🦈🦈💙 #travelforacause video by @juansharks with @lauracorbe @andycorbe @natseamonkey #sharks #shark #surfingwithsharks #supwithsharks interested in #sup #standuppaddling check out @oneoceanconservation lead & fellow #oneoceanseaster & #sharkdiver @mermaidyogagirlboss & her company @yogakaihawaii out of @fourseasons in #koolina #oahu #learnaboutsharks #oneoceandiving @oneoceandiving
270 9,884
oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
7 hours ago
oneoceandiving Epic shot by issy taken on a recent tour of sandbar and galapagos sharks, the two primary species we see at our aggregation site! can you spot the differences between the two species? sandbar sharks are noticeably smaller in size, have white tips on the trailing edge of their pectoral fins, a proportionally larger dorsal fin, as well as more pointed angular features. come out with us to learn more about sharks and to see them for yourself! _______________ #repost @kohsclicks ・・・ galapagos and sandbar sharks 🦈 such an amazing experience with this crew who gave me a new insight into the true beauty and majestic nature of these creatures. go pro spotted: hawaii - north shore oahu @oneoceandiving _____________ want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at oneoceandesigns.com mahalo and thank you for supporting #internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount #sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean #savetheocean #savesharks #helpsavesharks #oceanconservation #sharkconservation
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oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
9 hours ago
oneoceandiving Many sharks are cold-blooded, meaning their body temperature is consistent with the water temperature. humans are warm blooded since we generally maintain a temperature that is higher than the environment. some sharks though are an exception! lamnid sharks include the white, porbeagle, mako and salmon sharks, and these are actually endotherms (carlson et al., 2004)! the lamnid sharks are able to preserve their metabolic heat through vascular counter current heat exchangers so that their body temp is higher than the water temp (carlson et al., 2004). the counter-current heat exchangers retain heat that would have been lost when blood is oxygenated at the gill lamellae (goldman, 1997). this generally causes them to have a higher metabolic rate compared to other shark species. white sharks benefit from this in that they can still hunt in cold temperatures and have a burst of speed that relies on a generation of heat. lamnid sharks also have retia, which is an arrangement of vessels that warm the eyes and brain of the shark (helfman et al., 1997). this has the potential of helping the shark see prey movement (brill et al., 2005). thresher sharks, belonging to the alopiidae family, also have retia! photo by: @juansharks post by: @nikitapatel_23
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oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
10 hours ago
oneoceandiving It is theorized that humpback whales have the ability to learn through imitation (weinrich et al., 1992). ‘‘it is possible that humpback mothers and calves are doing the same. the calf may learn through observation of her mother and by attempting to mimic her behavior. investigating the sequence of behaviors between mothers and their calves could provide insight into this hypothesis,” sayid dr. mark h. deakos while personally observing natural behaviors between mother and calves. one commonly seen behavior is breaching! many species of cetaceans have been known to breach (pryor, 1986), and this behavior between mothers and calves usually happens while they are playing (gilmore 1961). that makes these photos of a south pacific humpback mother and calf pair breaching together all the more interesting, as it could be both a playful and learning experience for the calf. post by: @danabjarner photos by: @danabjarner want to learn more? check us out at oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water  in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver #helpsavesharks #savesharks #itstheirocean #apexpredatornotmonster #finbannow #stopfinning check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our #education outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at www.oneoceandesigns.com mahalo and thank you for supporting #internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount #sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean #savetheocean #savesharks #helpsavesharks #oceanconservation #sharkconservation #apexpredatornotmonster thank you for supporting shark and marine conservation.
5 1,690
scoobatam

@scoobatam

Tammy Pappin
Yesterday
scoobatam This violent act is really disturbing, imagine if these were 15 native land animals or birds left this way. what would be said and done then. #repost from @apexharmony 15 sharks found dead at fingal head has sparked outrage from residents. people should be outraged. these sharks are harmless and this brutal slaughter is completely needless and extremely detrimental to our ocean's eco systems. article: @northernstar_news photo: laelia gardner #healthyoceansneedsharks #learnaboutsharks #apexharmony
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oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
Yesterday
oneoceandiving In the animal kingdom, communication behaviors between members of the same species happens for different reasons: to request food from parents, threaten opponents during conflict, keep predators away, warn others of danger, attract members of the opposite sex, etc. (dugatkin & reeve, 1998). during the winter months in hawaii, male humpback whales are often seen performing these behaviors during mating season, acting aggressively towards others around the same area while competing for sexually mature females. (c. scott baker and, louis m. herman 1984). these mating strategies have been described as male dominance polygyny (clapham, 1996). the “competition” between two or more males for females usually begins with a behavior called “broadside displays” where the principal escort swims horizontally across the challenging male, blocking its path towards the female, (walther, 1984) but sometimes when it gets more aggressive they use other behaviors like head lunging, underwater blows, and sometimes they will release air from the mouth so that the bubbles may disorientate the other whale. (baker & herman, 1984). image by @darrenjew of a heat run in tonga 🐋🐋🐋 _____________ want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at oneoceandesigns.com mahalo and thank you for supporting #internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount #sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean #savetheocean #savesharks #helpsavesharks #oceanconservation #sharkconservation
27 3,908
oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
Yesterday
oneoceandiving Awesome information via @queenofmantas on the impact of #microplastics on marine megafauna including whale sharks and manta rays. check out the link at the bottom of this post to read more and to access a recently published and very well written paper titled “microplastics: no small problem for filter-feeding megafauna” #plasticistherealkiller ________________ repost @queenofmantas @everydayextinction ・・・ repost from a contribution i made to @everydayextinction surrounded by plastic pollution and other human waste, a reef manta ray (mobula alfredi) struggles to feed at a critical feeding site within the bird’s head seascape. despite being one of indonesia’s flagship marine protected areas, strong throughflow currents, which transport over 15 million cubic meters of water per second through the archipelago, circulate plastic pollution to even the farthest reaches of the nation’s archipelago. once ingested, plastic pollution, which is impossibly slow to break down, can build up in the stomachs of filter feeding organisms, like whales, sharks and rays, causing blockages and malabsorbtion of food. an incredible adherent of toxins and persistent organic pollutants like pcbs, plastics can also have other cryptic long-term effects on animals as they accumulate dangerous levels of these toxins and pollutants in their bodies. long-term exposure can even alter hormone levels, which regulate growth, development and reproductive functions, posing serious threats to the health of individuals and their offspring. the short and long-term effects of microplastic ingestion on marine animals is only slowly being understood but are likely to have grave impacts on whale sharks and manta rays, which are currently are listed as endangered and vulnerable to extinction respectively. read more about this dangerous anthropogenic threat to marine filter feeders in this newly published review by @marinemegafauna researchers and our collaborators https://marinemegafaunafoundation.org/blog/microplastics-no-small-problem/
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mterstorg

@mterstorg

#TeamNeverQuit
2 days ago
mterstorg #repost from @apexharmony. 15 sharks found dead at fingal head have sparked outrage from residents. people should be outraged. these sharks are harmless and this brutal slaughter is completely needless and extremely detrimental to our ocean's eco systems. article: @northernstar_news photo: laelia gardner #healthyoceansneedsharks #learnaboutsharks #apexharmony
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apexharmony

@apexharmony

Op Apex Harmony - SS Global
2 days ago
apexharmony 15 sharks found dead at fingal head have sparked outrage from residents. people should be outraged. these sharks are harmless and this brutal slaughter is completely needless and extremely detrimental to our ocean's eco systems. article: @northernstar_news photo: laelia gardner #healthyoceansneedsharks #learnaboutsharks #apexharmony
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oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
2 days ago
oneoceandiving It might look silly to watch a shark come up and take a big gulp of air as if they were a person submerged for more than a minute, but that’s what sand tiger sharks do! though, they are not surfacing for the same reason a person would need to surface- they swallow the air to maintain buoyancy.  sand tiger sharks do not have a swim bladder, and frequently surface to swallow in air, which they store in their stomach. the retention of the air allows them to attain near- neutral buoyancy, which is very helpful and efficient in terms of the sand tigers hunting style. since the sand tiger has the same average density as the water in their neutrally buoyant state, they do not have to expend a lot of energy in order to swim, as they are able to suspend themselves in the water and move almost motionlessly. (perrine, 1999) due to their lazier lifestyle, sand tiger sharks are able to actively ventilate and hang out in the currents in order to move. (smith et. al. 2004) since sand tiger sharks are relatively inactive compared to some other species, along with their rugged and intense shark looks, they are also sought after for aquariums. in the transport process, handlers remove some of the air being held in their stomach so that the shark is at a state of negative buoyancy, and is easier to transport in the container. it can be harmful to the health of any species to go to a captive environment, and while sand tigers are present in many large scale aquariums, transport and adjustment pose a large threat to their natural process of maintaining buoyancy. after the air is forcefully taken out of the shark for transport and reintroduced into an aquatic environment, the sand tiger must frequently gulp air at the surface to get back to their optimal neutral buoyancy. if this is not done, or is not achievable for the shark in the stressful environment, the shark will need to be introduced to a tube in order to artificially get air into the stomach. (smith et.al. 2004) come out with us to learn more about sharks and observe them in the wild on their own terms on a pelagic research dive! post by @kberry122 epic photo by @uw_photography_
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oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
2 days ago
oneoceandiving In one of yesterday’s posts we discussed where galapagos sharks got their name, but have you ever wondered where sandbar sharks (another species seen on our tours) get their name? the #sandbarshark is commonly found over muddy or sandy bottoms in shallow coastal waters such as bays, estuaries, harbors, or the mouths of rivers, but it also swims in deeper waters as well. sandbar sharks are found in tropical to temperate waters world wide and are a part of the carcharhinidae family, native to the atlantic ocean and the indo-pacific. it is distinguishable by its very high first dorsal fin and inter-dorsal ridge. it is not to be confused with its similarly named shark cousin, the sand tiger shark. the sandbar shark is also called the thick skin shark or brown shark.it is one of the biggest coastal sharks in the world, and is closely related to the dusky shark, the big nose shark, and the bull shark. its dorsal fin is triangular and very high and it has very long pectoral fins. sandbar sharks usually have heavy-set bodies and rounded snouts that are shorter than the average shark's snout. their upper teeth have broadly uneven cusps with sharp edges (allen). its second dorsal fin and a**l fin are close to the same height. females reach s****l maturity around the age of 13 with an average fork-length of 154.9 cm (stevens). while males tend to reach maturity around age 12 females have been found to exhibit both biennial and triennial reproductive cycles, ovulate in early summer, and give birth to an average of 8 pups, which they carry for 1 year before giving birth (baremore). this species is long lived and takes over a decade to reach s****l maturity making it extremely difficult for them to rebound after heavy fishing pressure. we are grateful to still have relatively healthy populations of this species here in hawaii whereas the atlantic population has been depleted by 85-97% (iucn, musick et al. 2009). post by @brian_marrocco photo by @ambermozo
18 5,104
oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
2 days ago
oneoceandiving Save the date and stay tuned to @oneoceanconservation for details coming soon on our next monthly cleanup on march 10th! #plasticfreeforthesea check out @kennaaloha for more awesome artwork and be on the lookout for new conservation awareness stickers featuring some of her designs coming soon! _______________ #repost @oneoceanconservation ・・・ art from one ocean team member, @kennaaloha. stay tuned for more information on our next beach cleanup taking place on march 10th from 12:00-3:00pm. ❤️ [location yet to be determined] thanks again to all who helped out with last weekend’s cleanup! #savetheocean _____________ want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at oneoceandesigns.com mahalo and thank you for supporting #internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount #sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean #savetheocean #savesharks #helpsavesharks #oceanconservation #sharkconservation
19 3,680
oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
2 days ago
oneoceandiving Recent research indicates that surprisingly, not all sharks are carnivores! in order to be an omnivore, an organism must be able to get nutrients and energy from both plants and animals. at the society for integrative and comparative biology 2018 meeting, samantha leigh reported that the bonnethead shark was actually able to digest seagrass! the sharks in the study were fed a diet of 90% seagrass that was marked with enriched co2. blood tests were then analyzed to determine whether or not carbon from the seagrass was digested based on the markers. levels of an enzyme that breaks down cellulose, b-glucosidase, were spiked in the guts of the sharks.  in some populations of bonnethead sharks, juveniles were found to have 62% of their stomach contents composed of seagrass. whether or not eating seagrass is incidental has yet to be determined. other scientists in the past have noted that the bonnethead consumes seagrass (cortes et al., 1996), but now we know that the shark is a true omnivore. bonnethead sharks have a smaller head compared to its cousin, the hammerhead, and grow to a max length of 150 cm (compagno, 1984). post by @nikitapatel_23 photo by michael patrick o’neil @mpophotography ________________ want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at oneoceandesigns.com mahalo and thank you for supporting #internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount #sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean #savetheocean #savesharks #helpsavesharks #oceanconservation #sharkconservation
13 2,815
oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
3 days ago
oneoceandiving
Throw back to when tank the tiger was out at our site getting lots of love from @juansharks mahalo to @clarklittle for capturing this great moment! occasionally we have tiger sharks come through on our dives and it’s such a treat! come out with us and you could be lucky enough to see one! ______________________ #repost @clarklittle ・・・ 🦈 tank wanting and getting some 💙 from @juansharks #savesharks @oneoceandiving #clarklittle 🆑
103 4,312
oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
3 days ago
oneoceandiving So stoked to have this wonderful repeat customer out on our dive recently. getting to free dive with sharks is the best way to start your day as well as learn about these beautiful creatures who inhabit our ocean. _____________________ #repost @artemoe ・・・ every time i go out on the boat with @oneoceandiving @oneoceanresearch i learn something new. this trip was awesome. we saw whales, dolphins and some got to see a hammerhead shark. the water was glassy and smooth and the visibility was great. this was the first time i have ever shot with a fisheye in the water. it was a bit challenging but i feel like i got some good images. also just a side note, i am one of those people that get seasick easily. you would think that after so much time in the ocean and stents on boats that i would have gotten used to it, but i haven’t. even shooting in the shore break and surfing, i get motion sickness. i have never let it stop me though. it’s just something i except and put up with. i take pictures, puke to the side then turn around and take more pictures again. on this day i got sick as well, yet i can’t wait to go back and experience it again.
7 1,539
oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
3 days ago
oneoceandiving Mahalo nui loa to waimanalo elementary school for having our amazing @oneoceanglobal ambassador @nani.moana as a speaker for their career day! annika presented 4 presentations to a total of 70 students discussing shark/marine conservation, as well as ecotourism and marine research/education. in addition to enlightening the students on what sharks are truly like, why they are so important, and what's happening to them, annika emphasized the many possibilities of career paths relating to our oceans~ science (marine biology, etc.), ecotourism, underwater photography, writing, environmental law, etc. more importantly, she encouraged them that even if they don't choose to go into marine science or any of those fields for their full time occupation, they can always be marine/wildlife conservationists- at any age. thank you annika for inspiring this group of enthusiastic kids to use their voices for these animals, support sustainable living, and to take time to help save our sharks and save our oceans through the spread of awareness💙🦈 ________________ want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at oneoceandesigns.com mahalo and thank you for supporting #internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount #sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean #savetheocean #savesharks #helpsavesharks #oceanconservation #sharkconservation
5 785
oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
4 days ago
oneoceandiving #costumerrepost we are so glad to have taken @wheresmossynow out on our pelagic shark dive tour! it is so amazing to see our costumers spreading awareness to the world through social media about the importance of sharks in our oceans and marine ecosystems. standing up for what you believe in is the first step to changing the world into a better place and retaining the earths natural beauty. use your voice right now to help sharks finally get the protection that they deserve! come dive with us at one ocean diving for a chance to see for yourself how breathtaking these animals really are! #repost @wheresmossynow (@get_repost) ・・・ here come the troops 👌🦈 such an amazing way to appreciate all things sharks. so misunderstood, and with an average of 100 million 🦈🦈’s killed every year by humans, times running out. join one ocean diving on oahu for an educational snorkel with 6-10 foot sharks, and appreciate why it’s so important that all sharks are respected and should be protected ✅ you never know, you might see a tiger or a whale shark 🙌 today, we saw and heard humpback whales underwater, what a bonus! _________________ want to learn more? check us out at oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water  in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver #helpsavesharks #savesharks #itstheirocean #apexpredatornotmonster #finbannow #stopfinning check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our #education outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at www.oneoceandesigns.com mahalo and thank you for supporting #internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount #sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean #savetheocean #savesharks #helpsavesharks #oceanconservation #sharkconservation #apexpredatornotmonster thank you for supporting shark and marine conservation.
2 861
oneoceandiving

@oneoceandiving

One Ocean Diving
4 days ago
oneoceandiving We know plankton as the creme de la creme of dinner for whales and other marine creatures, but what are the role of plant plankton, known as phytoplankton? it is a plant that should be praised by all of humanity as an oxygen producing powerhouse that allows for life on land. phytoplankton produce energy through photosynthesis, a process in which carbon dioxide, water and sunlight are used by the plant to produce glucose, with oxygen as a byproduct. these kinds of plants are known as primary producers, as they are the reason that complex life can exist. (noaa) while the number is not certain, some studies estimate that up to 80% of the world’s oxygen is produced by phytoplankton, kelp, algae and other marine plants that use photosynthesis. (whitman, 2017) their use of photosynthesis not only helps in the production of oxygen, but also the capturing of carbon in order to produce oxygen as a byproduct of making their own energy. in this way of cycling carbon dioxide and producing oxygen, phytoplankton and other marine plants play a vital role in controlling the world's climate, and alleviating some of the pressures of climate change by decreasing the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. (falkowski) they are able to produce a large portion of the oxygen present in the world because the ocean comprises much of the ocean's surface, and these marine plants are abundant near the surface to grab the carbon from the atmosphere and utilize the sun's rays. it is amazing how the health of the ocean so directly correlates to the health of life on land, and provides us with so many aspects of life that would not be possible without the functioning of the ocean and its inhabitants! post by: @kberry122 photo by: seahack.org via @nakaweproject
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