oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks @oneoceandiving proudly brings Shark & Marine Conservation presentations to your school or group! Learn how you can #helpsavesharks🦈 DM to schedule! http://oneoceandiving.com/
309 posts
3,224 followers
548 following
oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
2 days ago
oneoceaneducation #repost @oneoceandiving with ・・・ we know plankton as the creme de la creme of dinner for whales and other marine creatures, but what are the role of plant plankton, known as phytoplankton? it is a plant that should be praised by all of humanity as an oxygen producing powerhouse that allows for life on land. phytoplankton produce energy through photosynthesis, a process in which carbon dioxide, water and sunlight are used by the plant to produce glucose, with oxygen as a byproduct. these kinds of plants are known as primary producers, as they are the reason that complex life can exist. (noaa) while the number is not certain, some studies estimate that up to 80% of the world’s oxygen is produced by phytoplankton, kelp, algae and other marine plants that use photosynthesis. (whitman, 2017) their use of photosynthesis not only helps in the production of oxygen, but also the capturing of carbon in order to produce oxygen as a byproduct of making their own energy. in this way of cycling carbon dioxide and producing oxygen, phytoplankton and other marine plants play a vital role in controlling the world's climate, and alleviating some of the pressures of climate change by decreasing the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. (falkowski) they are able to produce a large portion of the oxygen present in the world because the ocean comprises much of the ocean's surface, and these marine plants are abundant near the surface to grab the carbon from the atmosphere and utilize the sun's rays. it is amazing how the health of the ocean so directly correlates to the health of life on land, and provides us with so many aspects of life that would not be possible without the functioning of the ocean and its inhabitants! post by: @kberry122 photo by: seahack.org via @nakaweproject
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
2 days ago
oneoceaneducation #repost @oneoceandiving with ・・・ being the only true subarctic shark, the greenland shark is one of the largest species of sharks in the ocean growing to 21ft and up to 2200 pounds.  within the somniosdae (‘sleeper shark”) family, these sharks are mainly found in the north atlantic and arctic oceans. greenland sharks are known as the longest known living vertebrae, with life spans reaching to 200 years! these creamy grey to black sharks have very small dorsal and pectoral fins with large eyes. sometimes they are even observed with hitchhikers; worm-like parasites that dangle from their eyes. this species is known to consume various fish species but has never been observed actively hunting. they are also known scavengers attracted to the smell of rotting carcasses in the water and plying a critical role in regulating arctic ecosystems. greenland sharks are ovoviviparous, having litters of 10 pups at a time. greenland sharks are very toxic because of the high concentrations of trimethylamine oxide(tmao). the meat can not be eaten raw but has become a major delicacy in iceland known as hákarl or fermented shark.  although these sharks are not endangered, the fact that they are easy to catch accidentally or purposely, their varied diet and climate change has made them a threatened species.  though this shark is not well known, they are important to our arctic oceans ecosystem. post by: @love4sharks photo by @paulnicklen _____________ want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at oneoceandesigns.com mahalo and thank you for supporting #interna
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
2 weeks ago
oneoceaneducation Come join us and make a difference!! we welcome everyone and anyone!! tell your friends and family, bring them along!!! ••• #repost @oneoceandiving with ・・・ come out tomorrow to our reef and beach cleanup and have the chance to win a prize while helping to keep our island and our ocean clean🌊🦈🐋🙏🏼 ______________________ #repost @keiko_conservation ・・・ the awesome team at @knektusa have donated one of their @gopro 5 domes for a fun little challenge at our next cleanup with @oneoceandiving x @waterinspired! come make some #nerdsagainstnurdles microplastic art during the clean up at kahana bay from 12-3pm this saturday! our favorite one will win it! see you there! #oneoceandiving #keikoconservation #waterinspired #marinedebris #knektusa #microplastic #nurdles #grab4tag4
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
2 weeks ago
oneoceaneducation #repost @oneoceandiving with ・・・ through the 1950’s and 60s humpback whale reproductive research was  done very differently than it is nowadays. thousands of whales harvested by the whaling industries were used to investigate the animals' reproductive organs,  ovaries and testes, and status of any fetuses (e.g., chittlebourough 1958, nishiwaki 1959, dawbin 1966). although this provided a significant amount of information about their reproductive cycle, nothing was revealed about their actual mating behavior.  then, in the mid-1970s, they began to study whales in their natural habitat and it was a  game changer. the first understandings of natural mating behavior emerged using methods like closely observing them from the surface and underwater. another method was by recording behavioral observations of specific whales identified by photographs of their natural marks (darling, j. d. and bérubé, m. 2001). this process is called photo identification. humpback whales have black and white pigmentation patterns and scars on the underside of their tails. these are unique to each whale, just as fingerprints are to humans (noaa). this allows scientists and naturalists to identify and monitor individual animals and gather valuable information about ,not only their reproductive behavior, but their population sizes, migration, health, and other behavior as well. (noaa) it's also a method we use to identify the sharks at @oneoceanresearch everyday! post and photo by @danajbarner @keiko_conservation_ecuador
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
3 weeks ago
oneoceaneducation #repost @oceanramsey ・・・ show your love for the ocean and sharks #helpsavesharks & #savetheocean by supporting the new awareness and conservation line from @xcelwetsuits @xcelhaleiwa & signing the petition in the @oneoceanconservation bio photo by my #juanandonly 🦈❤️ @juansharks of some but not all of some of my amazing #oneoceanseasters swimming, standing, and speaking up together for #sharks, #theocean, marine life, animals, and #nature special thanks to them and #xcelwetsuits for supporting the collaboration for #conservation #lovemyteam @saltandaloha @rams_hokulani @oneoceanconservation @oneoceaneducation @mermaidyogagirlboss @nani.moana @oneoceandesigns @madi_makoff @tahenley @oneoceanglobal @mermaid_kayleigh @waterinspired @kennaaloha @oneoceansharks @sharkysophie @seajewl @oneoceanresearch @michelelbarnes @shelle_belle_ @oneoceaninspired @kokocousteau @keiko_conservation @nataliekparra @honeygirl_ @tracyann_saltygirl and so many more i’ll be lucky if this goes through mahalo @instagram and come dive with us @oneoceandiving #oneoceandiving #teamoneocean #joinus #oneoceanseasters #waterinspired #oneoceanteam swipe right to see more 🦈🧜🏻‍♀️💙🧜🏻‍♀️🦈🧜🏻‍♀️ freedivewithsharks.com
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
4 weeks ago
oneoceaneducation #repost @oneoceandiving with ・・・ the blue whale (balaenoptera musculus) is the largest animal to live on earth ever! that includes all known dinosaurs (reeves et al., 2002). whalers before world war i measured the largest whale at more than 30m long and over 200 tons. (reeves et al., 2002). newborn whales are already 7m long (noaa). these gentle and immense creatures are endangered and have yet to recover from being extensively hunted in the 1900’s (gill, 2002). to eat, the whales have specialized baleen plates to trap krill, their main food source. to feed, the whales take a gulp of water containing the krill and then push the seawater out through the baleen, therefore trapping the krill inside their mouth (steele, 1970)! due to their large size, the whales need to eat 6 tons of krill per day (reeves et al., 2002). blue whales get their name because their blue-gray body looks aquamarine when underwater (reeves et al., 2002). it’s possible to use their whale-songs to distinguish between different populations (mcdonald et al., 2006). being able to differentiate the populations of whales allows for better management, which is crucial since they’re endangered. today, the greatest threats to blue whales are pollution, ship strikes and becoming entangled in plastic/fishing gear. post by @nikitapatel_23 photo by @ohdroneboy ______________ want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at www.hawaiisharkdiver.com mahalo and thank you for supporting #internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount #sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean #savetheocean #saveshark
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
4 weeks ago
oneoceaneducation At school presentations, kids always ask us when they can come out and swim with the sharks and we love that question! it’s amazing to see the shift in perception of sharks! media and entertainment still like to portray sharks in a negative, monstrous light, but the power of social media has helped spread the news far and wide that sharks are absolutely vital to not only the marine ecosystem, but our very own lives on land. thank goodness the jaws era is slowly fading out, but sharks still face a treacherous plight - dying at an alarming rate by the hands of men, greed, and even innocent misinformation. but there are fighters out there, speaking up for sharks and all who don’t have a voice! so if your little one would like to join us in experiencing these beautiful animals in their natural environment (say no to captivity! 🙅🏻‍♀️), they just need to be 4ft. or taller to join us 😊. on the way out to meet the sharky loves, they get to learn all about sharks and how they can help save them! as always, we visit any school or group for shark and marine conservation presentations 🤗 ////// want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: oneoceandiving.com <http://oneoceandiving.com>>; & join us in the water in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanicramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at www.hawaiisharkdiver.com < mahalo and thank you for supporting #internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount #sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean #savetheocean #savesharks #helpsavesharks #oceanconservation #sharkconservation
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
4 weeks ago
oneoceaneducation As of january 19th, one ocean diving along with keiko conservation group compiled a senate bill to further protect shark and ray populations. the new bill, s.b. 2079, aims to ban the purposeful take or landing of sharks on hawaii shores, and establishes penalties for these actions. it is vital to protect sharks and rays from being overfished, as they are a key component in maintaining a healthy and balanced marine ecosystem. as an apex predators, sharks help to maintain the health of the marine ecosystem by controlling populations of species below them and helping to circulate nutrients, and rays feed on and help to control populations of bottom dwelling fish and invertebrates. they both also have a very small litter, mature late, and don’t reproduce often, making them less likely to rebound from population dips due to bycatch and overfishing. with the protection of sharks and rays, hawaii will continue to be able to support recreational activities, a thriving marine environment, and maintain the integrity of a culture so connected to the ocean. the bill also aims to protect the people of hawaii. by decreasing the number of hooks at shore, there are less sharks that are present, thereby limiting shark and human interaction where many recreational activities take place. to help get this bill enacted, we need your support! to get involved, follow the link in @oneoceanconservation bio to submit a letter to a senator or representative or to sign our petition- let them know that you value the lives of sharks and rays! thank you so much for your support, and please spread the word! post by @kberry122 photo by @oceanramsey, edit by @shelle_belle_ ____________ want to learn more about sharks or adoption visit our website: oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
4 weeks ago
oneoceaneducation Congratulations to our contest winners! @g.r.a.t.e.l @sunblastbecky and @kaalaea @oceanramsey was so stoked to see how many people participated that she selected 3 additional people to receive a gift in the mail from @oneoceandesigns these winners are @deessssy @letsgetlost_lv and @christilevannier don’t forget theres still time to win the @waterinspired wetsuit from @xcelwetsuits link is in @oneoceandesigns bio we also ask that you please sign our petition to #savethesharks the link is in @oneoceanconservation bio. thank you to everyone who participated and those who continue to #helpsavesharks 🐋💙 photo by: @juansharks post by: @myahbaeza want to learn more? check us out at oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water  in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver #helpsavesharks #savesharks #itstheirocean #apexpredatornotmonster #finbannow #stopfinning check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our #education outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at www.oneoceandesigns.com mahalo and thank you for supporting #internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount #sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean #savetheocean #savesharks #helpsavesharks #oceanconservation #sharkconservation #apexpredatornotmonster thank you for supporting shark and marine conservation.
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
5 weeks ago
oneoceaneducation #jawdropping photo by @juansharks #juanoliphant @juansharks diving with @oceanramsey #oceanramsey 🦈🦈🦈 #repost @mermaid_kayleigh 🔄 please join the ocean advocates of @oneoceandiving and @keiko_conservation in conserving hawaii's vital marine predators by signing our petition which will show your support in our bill relating to shark and ray protection in the state of hawaii. sharks play an important role as apex predators in the ocean food web and are regarded in high honor as hawaiian ʻaumakua or family guardians and ancestors. sharks deserve to have protection just like dolphins, whales, turtles, and other irreplaceable marine life. the link to the petition is in the @oneoceanglobal bio. please sign and share! mahalo nui loa from all the #oneoceanseasters! truly remarkable shot by @juansharks of #sharkidlexi! 🙌🏼🦈 #savesharks #helpsavesharks #hawaiisharkcount #oneoceandiving #waterinspired
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
5 weeks ago
oneoceaneducation Little is known about the long-term movement patterns of tiger sharks. this species is believed to be wide-ranging, and unpredictable (meyer, c. g. et al 2009). their visitation to certain areas may be spread out by absences of weeks, months or years (meyer, c. g. et al 2009). this pattern of unpredictability may be an ideal foraging strategy for catching prey because it keeps the element of surprise alive. despite the fluctuating movement of tiger sharks scientists believe that they use "cognitive maps" to move between foraging sites (meyer, c.g et al 2010). tiger sharks are able to move and navigate dynamically between expansive ranges and open ocean (holland, k.n. et al 1999). 📸 by @juansharks of @oceanramsey sharing the water with a tiger shark ___________________________
check us out at oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water in #hawaii on #oahu #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaiiwith a trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver 
check out our #shark and #marineresearch@oneoceanresearch and our #education outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharksand our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanicramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassadorlooking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at www.freedivewithsharks.com/shop-1/ 
mahalo and thank you for supporting 
#internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount#sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean#savetheocean #savesharks #helpsavesharks#oceanconservation  #sharkconservation#itstheirocean #apexpredatornotmonster
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
last month
oneoceaneducation Aggregating, or grouping behavior, is seen across several shark orders, including carcharhiniformes, heterodontiformes, squatiniformes, and hexanchiformes(mourier et al. 2011). there can be many factors that could cause certain species to come together. among these are cooperative hunting(ebert 1991), mating(sims et al. 2000), communication/passing along social information(klimley & nelson 1981), and protection from predators or unwanted attention from the opposite sex(economakis & lobel 1998, wearmouth & sims 2008). although sharks may be found to aggregate together, it is still difficult to track individuals well enough that social interactions and behaviors can be well documented. this is why we are conducting a population study on the sharks here on the north shore of o'ahu, to observe these individual sharks and their behavior, whether they aggregate for mating, communication, cooperative feeding, or a combination of reasons. so far we have found that although the sharks found at our sites are typically male, female galapagos sharks are much more abundant in the summer months and their bodies are more swollen and sport new scars indicative of mating. 💞 there is still so much to learn about these animals but they are disappearing an an unsustainably high rate due to #sharkfinsoup #sharkcull and #longlining. help us save these sharks and our seas by spreading awareness, knowing where your seafood comes from, and being politically involved. your influence is larger than you realize! #bethedifference post by @shelle_belle_ photo by @juansharks
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
last month
oneoceaneducation (continued from part 1 of 2) our current and next generation will ultimately shape what happens to our environment, and that’s why it is just as important to educate children as it is adults. children who have misconceptions that originate from myths about an unfamiliar animal or incorrect information from the mass media are more likely to possess negative perceptions (tsoi kh 2011). to provide essential baseline data pertaining to educational efforts, there was a project published (© 2016 tsoi et al) that gathered the perceptions of 11 to 12 year-old hong kong students about their understanding of ecological concepts with shark-related knowledge. the results indicate that the students lack sufficient knowledge and possess misconceptions about sharks and their #ecological role. “the students’ conceptual understanding level is strongly correlated with their perceptions. the ecological role of sharks in the marine ecosystem is usually ignored or misunderstood. alarming portrayals of sharks, particularly the great white, as some of the most feared and mysterious creatures on the planet, are widespread. in one study, children between 4 and 13 years of age perceived “jumping into a shark-infested pool” as one of the most fearful situations when they were asked to draw a risky situation in a draw-and-write investigation about how risk was perceived by these children.” (tsoi kh, chan sy, lee yc, ip bhy, cheang cc (2016) shark conservation: an educational approach based on children’s knowledge and perceptions toward sharks) be a role model! help teach our youth (and adults) the #truthaboutsharks. post by @kayla_jean_lamberson photo by @juansharks
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
last month
oneoceaneducation (part 1 of 2) shark conservation is a complex issue that involves multiple countries around the world. unfortunately, banning the sale of #shark fins in the united states would likely not result in a significant direct reduction in global shark mortality, because the united states exports approximately one percent of all the shark fins traded globally, and imports an even smaller percentage of the global fin trade. (f. dent, s. clarke 2015). although, it could set an example for other countries to follow. these few imports to the us include fins from nations where #finning is already banned, as well as fins legally taken by united states #fishermen, exported overseas for processing, and imported back into the united states as dried shark fin product. hong kong has long been recognized as the world’s largest shark fin importer (clarke s, milner-gulland ej 2007) contributing at least 50% of the global trade in fins.  clarke et al noted that hong kong is the major warehouse for shark fins in the mainland chinese market. however, there are signs that the trading center for shark fins has shifted from hong kong to mainland china. (clarke s, milner-gulland ej). what’s interesting and crucially important to realize for future #conservation efforts, is that there have been reports of consumers that are no longer purchasing from shark fin vendors in guangzhou, china, of which some have given up fin consumption. their decision was not based solely “to protect sharks,” but also due to concerns about the possibility of buying fake fins, contamination of the fins with mercury, or the government’s banning of shark fins from banquets (hofford a 2014). because the reduction in consumption is not solely driven by a perceived need to save sharks, it is possible those who stopped fin consumption may easily change their minds. this is why education is so important! understanding why and how important the role that sharks portray in our environment can make a tremendous impact. (continued in part 2 of 2) post by @kayla_jean_lamberson photo by @juansharks
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
last month
oneoceaneducation By @ecoceanic please tag your friends & share to spread the facts. ❌ plastic 🔄 stainless steel ✔ purchase an ecoceanic earth bottle today to support marine conservation. 20% of profits are donated to @nakaweproject 💙🦈 link in bio. available worldwide 🌏 #endplastic ・ ⚠ in production: most bottled water is packaged in pet (polyethylene terephthalate) plastic bottles which are derived from crude oil. it can take up to 3l of water to produce 1l of water.🛑 ・ ⚠ in transportation: transportation of bottled water around the world requires burning of fossil fuels. ⛟💨 ・ ⚠ in landfill and the litter stream: although plastic bottles are recyclable, many end up in landfill and take up to 1000 years to break down. when littered they often end up in the sea where they break up in small pieces, killing marine life that mistake them for food.🐢🐋 ・ 💸save money 💱 instead of purchasing numerous bottles each year, why not get 1 that you can re-use, wash, refill & keep. it'll also reduce your carbon 👣 if you don't have one, #buynow and make a concious change. link in bio to purchase an #ecoceanic reusable bottle 💚🌱 #plasticpollution #noexcuseforsingleuse #🔚plastic #marinedebris #ecoceanic banner by @oceanmelli
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@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
last month
oneoceaneducation A beautiful reminder by @ellasavestheocean 💖 ・・・ my mom and i were doing my #biglifejournal before bed and this was the page we stopped on. i wanted to share this.❤️💜💛🧡💙💚
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@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
last month
oneoceaneducation Tiger sharks here in hawaii can store s***m from 4-5 months, they mate in jan/feb and then ovulate in july (whitney & crow, 2006). sharks that are nomadic can even hold onto s***m for years (pratt jr., 1993)! this allows them to be able to reproduce without having to encounter a mate during mating season, perfect for a shark always on the move. when stored, the s***m is kept in storage tubules located inside the oviducal gland in proximity to where the egg is (storrie et al., 2008). in 2012, a bamboo shark in captivity laid an egg 45 months after being 100% separated from any other males (bernal et al., 2015). at first, many people thought this was a v****n birth! this process called parthenogenesis has been documented in a few species of sharks but it is often difficult to document in a sharks natural habitat. post by @nikitapatel_23 photo by @juansharks of @oceanramsey _____________ want to learn more? check us out at oneoceandiving.com & join us in the water  in #hawaii on #oahu’s #northshore to #swimwithsharks and #divewithsharksinhawaii with a @oneoceandiving trained #marinebiologist / #sharksafetydiver #helpsavesharks #savesharks #itstheirocean #apexpredatornotmonster #finbannow #stopfinning check out our #shark and #marineresearch @oneoceanresearch and our #education outreach program @oneoceaneducation #learnaboutsharks and our non-profit @waterinspired conservation group and founders: @juansharks and @oceanramsey want to join the team? become a @oneoceanglobal ambassador looking to support in other ways? check out our not-for-profit marine conservation awareness apparel and gifts @oneoceandesigns or at www.oneoceandesigns.com mahalo and thank you for supporting #internationalsharkproject #hawaiisharkcount #sharkresearch #ocean #oneocean #savetheocean #savesharks #helpsavesharks #oceanconservation #sharkconservation #apexpredatornotmonster
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oneoceaneducation

@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
last month
oneoceaneducation What has “wings” and can fly (through the ocean)? a shark!! the pectoral fins of a shark greatly resemble in function and look that of an airplane. a sharks pectoral fins are fairly thick, but like the wings of a plane they thin out toward the back of the fin, are flat on the bottom, and are slightly angled downward. all these attributes of a shark's pectoral fin help with the lift of a shark, similarly how a plane is able to takeoff and stay in the air. though, different sharks have different shapes and sizes of their pectoral fins, acting in different ways for lift that best suits the animal. sharks with longer pectoral fins, namely blue and oceanic whitetip sharks, are perfect for being able to fly in oceanic currents. other species can have smaller pectoral fins, but in this case they do not need as much lift as they typically have a larger amount of liver oil, which helps with buoyancy. (crow et.al. 2002) while sharks fins do not have a large range of movement, there are ways that a shark can move its pectoral fins to maneuver through the water more efficiently, as well as display signals. (perrine, 1999. crow et.al. 2002) they can turn on a dime by angling their fins downward, similarly to when you are kayaking and as you pick up speed, you keep the paddle in the water to stop and turn. sharks also angle their fins downward in order to display signs of dominance to other sharks and even to swimmers. (crow et.al. 2002) this is a behavior that we look for out on dives at one ocean research and diving! by dropping their fins, sharks are trying to appear larger from a side angle than they would with their fins flat out swimming through the water. it helps the members out in the water recognize dominant sharks and the behavior of some sharks in larger groups. there are so many amazing social signals that sharks have adapted to display their intentions to the animals around them in a non-violent manner. sharks are very complex beings that are much more peaceful and civil predators than are typically portrayed. we hope you have the opportunity to come out and dive with us to witness these social behaviors first hand! post by @kberry12 photo by @juansharks
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@oneoceaneducation

OneOceanEducation #savesharks
last month
oneoceaneducation It’s a new year, and that means it’s time to set new goals and intentions! we encourage everyone to make the decision to incorporate a few small lifestyle changes this coming year that will have an incredible impact on the well-being of our planet. i reduce the amount of plastic you use. it’s as simple as investing in reusable water bottles, coffee mugs, & bags. a few other ideas... buy in bulk and use your own jars, invest in reusable utensils (including straws) & keep them in your car/purse, look for products that allow you to reuse & refill (like dr. bronner’s super awesome soaps). also, pick out a day, & keep tab on how much plastic you consume throughout it - you’ll be very surprised, & this will bring about quite a bit of personal awareness. i be mindful of your body care products. was an animal tortured & killed for something you are going to use? does it include ingredients harvested from critically endangered species (like sharks and squalene)? keep in mind, we are the species using these products - an animal should never have to suffer or die for that when there are many plant-based alternatives. check out the bunny free app for help determining which products are cruelty/animal free, & which are not. also, research the ingredients in your body care products - know what you’re putting into your body & out into the environment! i go meatless once a week! if a full vegan lifestyle isn’t something you’re ready for, try meatless/dairy free monday (or meatless/dairy free whatever day). by giving up animal products even once a week, you are drastically reducing your carbon footprint, making a healthy choice for yourself, & saving the life of quite a few animals. i go outside. that’s it. go outside. really experience nature. recognize how intricately connected to every single part of it you are. go outside. i make 2018 the year you become more conscious, more connected. be aware of yourself, your purchases, & the messages you’re sending. decide you want a better future for the generations to come, & yourself. if you need ideas, or tips, send us a message! i image & caption by team member @tahenley
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